KEGS Biology Blog


Daws Hall-Day 1
September 24, 2012, 6:50 pm
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Daws Hall – remember – no discussion of coursework

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We started the day by sampling area A (meadow) within daws hall. Our groups were given a point quadrat, point quadrat with 10 pins aswell as a recording sheet, identification sheet and random number sheet. We used the numbers on the random number sheet in order to determine the specific co-ordinates of our 1st quadrat sample. We sampled the area by dropping pin by pin into the point quadrat in order to see the different species of plants we had, every time the pin came into contact with a specie a point was scored. We repeated this 5 times at different co-ordinates, we then totalled the number of each species and entered our group’s results into the database. A average was then taken.

We then went to Daws Hall Brook and then did a series of tests e.g temp (C), oxygen (mg/l), oxygen (%) etc… and recorded our results.

Towards the end of the first day we set the ‘mammal traps’ and ‘moth trap’ overnight in order to see the different species of animals we could catch. This would be depend on various different factors such as temperature, season etc..

Rooben Nithiananthan 🙂

Comment by roobennithi

We started the day by sampling area A (meadow) within daws hall. Our groups were given a quadrat, point quadrat with 10 pins aswell as a recording sheet, identification sheet and random number sheet. We used the numbers on the random number sheet in order to determine the specific co-ordinates of our 1st quadrat sample. We sampled the area by dropping pin by pin into the point quadrat in order to see the different species of plants we had, every time the pin came into contact with a specie a point was scored. We repeated this 5 times at different co-ordinates, we then totalled the number of each species and entered our group’s results into the database. A average was then taken.

We then went to Daws Hall Brook and then did a series of tests e.g temp (C), oxygen (mg/l), oxygen (%) etc… and recorded our results.

Towards the end of the first day we set the ‘mammal traps’ and ‘moth trap’ overnight in order to see the different species of animals we could catch. This would be depend on various different factors such as temperature, season etc..

Rooben Nithiananthan 🙂

Comment by roobennithi

The first day at Daws Hall Nature Reserve was split up into three sections:

Firstly, at the Old Meadow, two areas of equal dimensions (10m x 10m) were measured and labelled “Area A” and “Area B”. Provided with a quadrat (0.5m x 0.5m), a Point Frame (with ten pins 10cm apart), identification sheet, recording sheet and random number table, we randomly sampled 5 areas in each “Area”. Reading of 5 consecutive numbers from the table, we chose our coordinates. By laying down the quadrat, we were able to identify the number of different species present at that location and identified each one with the aid of the Identification Sheet. Next, the Point Frame was used to identify the precise frequency of different species from the two areas of the meadow. Each pin was lowered into the frame and a “point” was awarded to each species if it was touched by the pin. After repeating this process for 5 areas in “Area A” and 5 areas in “Area B”, we had gathered suitable date to collate and analyse afterwards. This helped us to determine the species richness in those areas of the meadow.

Secondly, at the Daws Hall Brook, we took results for various properties of the broom water. Properties such as oxygen levels, nitrate levels, phosphate levels, turbidity amongst simpler tests for temperature and pH were recorded. Next, we undertook the same tests at the neighbouring river. From this data, we can see trends, similarities and differences between the two sets of data and compare them to identify why the results were different/similar?

Finally, mammal traps and a moth trap were set. Each group of three were given two Longworth mammal traps. One trap was set along a region bordering the woodland and meadow, and the second was set further downhill in the woodland area. Noticeably, both areas were visibly different (see Day 2 Summary).

Please add/correct anything

Comment by Deelan Vadher

The ‘light trap’ was used to trap the moths, this trap consisted of a mercury vapor lamp which attracted moths and other nocturnal flying insects. The flying insects flew into the trap, hit the baffles falling to the base and becoming trapped in the cardboard boxes. The reason why moths are attracted to the light is because they need light for navigation.

Comment by roobennithi

The bulb emitted ultraviolet light wihch disorientated the moths (they were not attracted by it)

Moths are active through the night (nocturnal), therfore use the moon as a reference in the sky for a point of navigation. By keeping the angle between the flight path and relative position of the moon constant, moths are able to fly in straight lines. This lamp disorientated them by mimicking a ‘moon’, therefore the moths altered their flight paths by flying around the bulb in circles in order to keep the ‘moon’ at a constant distance and angle. Eventually, they dropped into the trap, where they lay dormant.

Comment by Deelan Vadher




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