KEGS Biology Blog


Thursday 13th September 2012 Section 3
September 13, 2012, 8:24 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

Sampling techniques and Species richness vs Species eveness

Advertisements

18 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Nisitha and Yuan table:

Quadrat A B C D E
1 80% 20%

A= Grass
B= Clover

Comment by nisithadissanayake

Hannah and Spencer

Quadrat A B C D E
1 80% 84% 52% 100% –

A = Grass
B = Dandelion
C = Ladies Bedstraw
D = Clover

Comment by hannahgooch

Measuring biodiversity

Species richness – This is the number of different species found in a certain area; the more species found, the higher the richness e.g 2 different species found means a species richness of 2. However, species richness does not tell us which species are common or rare.

Species evenness – This is the number of each type of species, recorded as either a percentage or as a raw number. There are two possible outcomes; either lots of species with 1 or 2 dominant kinds, or lots of species of equal number. To differentiate organisms, use a species key to decided whether or not they are the part of the same species.

If it is impractical to count individually how many of each species there are, use the ACFOR scale (abundant, common, frequent, occasional, rare) as a rough indicator.

Areas with many different species tend to be more stable and are better at coping with environmental change. If an area only contains one type of species, then a change of conditions such as temperature could result in the entire area dying.

Results for Phil and Candice:

Quadrat 1: Species A 85%; Species B 7%; Species C 13%
Quadrat 2: Species A 80%; Species B 20%;

A = Grass
B = Clover
C = Dandelion

Comment by phillipmarriage

This is actually really good detail and all
Can add to my notes now

Comment by halima95

Measuring biodiversity

Species richness – This is the number of different species found in a certain area; the more species found, the higher the richness e.g 2 different species found means a species richness of 2. However, species richness does not tell us which species are common or rare.

Species evenness – This is the number of each type of species, recorded as either a percentage or as a raw number. There are two possible outcomes; either lots of species with 1 or 2 dominant kinds, or lots of species of equal number. To differentiate organisms, use a species key to decided whether or not they are the part of the same species.

If it is impractical to count individually how many of each species there are, use the ACFOR scale (abundant, common, frequent, occasional, rare) as a rough indicator.

Areas with many different species tend to be more stable and are better at coping with environmental change. If an area only contains one type of species, then a change of conditions such as temperature could result in the entire area dying.

Results for Phil and Candice:

Quadrat 1: Species A 85%; Species B 7%; Species C 13%
Quadrat 2: Species A 80%; Species B 20%;

A = Grass
B = Clover
C = Dandelion

Comment by phillipmarriage

Quadrat 1: Species A – 75% Species B – 20% Species C – 5%

A= Grass
B= Clover
C= Dandelion

Jake and gautam

Comment by jakepalmer1

Ben and Jaimie

A= grass (61%)
B= clover (11%)
C=Dandilion (4%)
D=lady’s bedstraw (22%)
E= Other plant (unidentified) (2%)

Comment by bensubhani

Halima and Mehleen table
Quadrat 1
Species A (grass) -100%
Species B (flower) – 88%
Species C (Dandelion leaves/flower) – 12%
Species D (3-leaf clovers) – 88%

Comment by halima95

Ignore the above table and Mehleen’s one. They’re wrong. This is the actual rresult. The key is still the same though.
A – 62%
B – 28%
C – 8%
D – 2%

Comment by halima95

Mehleen and Halima

A (grass) = 100%
B (Lady’s Bedstraw) = 16%
C (Dandelion) = 12%
D (Clovers) = 88%

Comment by mehleen

Deelan and Alex

A=Grass Q1: 65% Q2: 80% Q3: 70%
B=Clover Q1: 20% Q2: 20% Q3: 15%
C=Dandelion Q1: 10% Q2: — Q3: 5%
D=Ladies’ Bedstraw Q1: 5% Q2: — Q3: 10%

Comment by deelanvadher

http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/plants_animals/new_species/

Comment by deelanvadher

Dan and Matt: Coordinates (10,2)

A= Grass (90%)
B= Clovers (7%)
C= Dandelions (3%)

Comment by danialnaqvi

Helen and Hanali
A – 100% – grass
B – 25% – dandelion
C – 100% – Ladies bed straw

Comment by helenquah

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/13630240

Comment by gautammenon1

i’m beasting
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11607299

Comment by gautammenon1

http://www.trust.org/alertnet/news/protecting-biodiversity-key-to-food-security-adaptation-expert
short article on the importance of biodiversity

Comment by jakepalmer1




Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: